Sonnet

The cancellation calculator feature

Helping home and auto insurance policy owners, exploring new insurance providers to understand the approximate costs involved with switching providers, before making a decision.
timeline

The project lasted about 5 days.

the team

1 Copywriter

2 Developers

1 Visual designer

3-4 Marketers

Legal representative (in-house, off-site)

My role

Researcher

UX designer

Visual designer

Main Goal

Increase purchases by giving more clarity to switching mid-term. By offering the approximate cost for cancelling coverage with their current provider.

The problem

Not enough quotes being saved.
The number of purchase of a home, auto or home and auto insurance was low.
There is a lack of knowledge about the costs involved when cancelling an active insurance policy.
The challenge

Increase purchases by increasing the number of home and auto insurance customers, who understand the approximate costs involved when thinking of switching insurance providers.

The great misconception about users was that currently insured people with a home, auto or home and auto insurance policy either:

  1. Didn’t know they had the option to switch insurance providers during an active policy
  2. Wanted to switch insurance providers during the active policy, but thought the costs were too high.

About the company

Sonnet insurance is a SAAS to physical product that offers home & auto insurance to Canada. Released in 2016 it is the first insurance company in Canada to offer home and auto insurance price and purchase without the need to make a phone call to anyone.

my Role

Remote usability testing, experience design and help visual design.

I conducted remote usability testing and experience design to help decide on the best implementation. The legal representative was in house but located off-site.

The visual designer, copywriter and I worked to create the pages for testing based on the suggestions I captured by the team. After which, I created an interactive prototype using Invisionapp. Remote research was planned and conducted by myself through usertesting.com.

If the developers had questions it was easy to answer and help with solutions.

I conducted remote usability testing and experience design to help decide on the best implementation.

Understanding the user

People who have a home or auto insurance policy with a provider in Ontario.

  1. Home or auto customers of the competition:
    AVIVA, TD Meloche Monnex, Desjardins, RBC Insurance, The Co-operators and Intact.
  2. Owns a vehicle.
  3. Male, female and couples.
  4. Age 22-35.
  5. Income: 35k-100k.
  6. Living in Ontario.
  7. Interested in shopping around for a new policy.

Breaking down the process

Constraints

This project was already close to it’s end when I arrived at Sonnet and so there was no brief given to me. I wanted to get results quickly which lasted 5 days to get everything together. I worked with the product manager in dialogue to give usability recommendations that would give this new feature heavy traffic by visitors.

The marketing stakeholders, the primary company stakeholders needed to be educated and convinced that the initial usability recommendations to add a secondary button to the hero area in order to drive traffic to the cancellation calculator page was not well received because as I understood it, there were strongly opposed to adding anything other than one button to the hero. From that perspective, they added ideas in the mix on how to achieve the goal. This naturally lead to planning and conducting a usability test to ground all ideas and future decisions in data.

Sonnet homepage in March 2017
Sonnet homepage in March 2017

Process

I use 1 of 2 types of processes.The first is:

  • A general process that usually covers most products.
  • The other which I'd like to use more often is IDEO user-centered process to solving challenges.

General process that covers most situations
General process that covers most situations

The cancellation calculator page was already designed and the next task was to explore how visitors who came to the site from the homepage would access the calculator. I made usability recommendations that were not received very well by the marketing team, who are the primary stakeholders and decision makers. So I set out to conduct a remote usability test that would validate or invalidate all the ideas in the mix.


The first step: Identify

Identify the exact problem or task that needed to be solved. This was done through communication with my product manager.


The second step: Empathize

Was to define the people that I would need to help me test the options. So, I asked my product manager who were:

  1. Home or auto customers of the competition: AVIVA, TD Meloche Monnex, Desjardins, RBC Insurance, The Co-operators and Intact.
  2. Owns a vehicle
  3. Male and Female
  4. Age 22-35
  5. Income: 50k-100k
  6. Living in Ontario


The third step: Understand

Was that I understood what needed to be done. Understanding the goal as it relates to Sonnet.

The fourth step: Prototype

Was to make sure the assets were ready to create a prototype that the target audience testers would interact with. Then I wrote the remote testing plan being used on usertesting.com. The 4 design options to access the page were:

  1. Adding a secondary button to the hero area and footer area.
  2. Adding a text link under the primary button in the footer.
  3. Replacing the help section with a new section to the page.
  4. Adding a visual update and less copy to the page section.


Wireframe of calculation calculator home and product page access.
Wireframe of proposed solution. From top —Homepage hero, Product page hero, Global footer.

Option 1

Adding a secondary button to the hero area and footer area.

Option 1: Add secondary button to hero and footer
Option 1: Adding a secondary button to the hero area and footer area.

Option 2

Adding a text link under the primary button in the footer

Option 2: Adding a text link under the primary button in the footer
Option 2: Adding a text link under the primary button in the footer

Option 3

Replacing the help section with a new section to the page.

Option 3: Replacing the help section with a new section to the page.

Option 4

Adding a visual update and less copy to the page section.

Option 4: Adding a visual update and less copy to the page section.

The fifth step: Test

The test focused on using:

  1. Options 1-3 only because options 3 and 4 were variations of page sections.
  2. Five people per test because after that number patterns start to be repetitive.

Results round 1:

The results came back which were documented and presented to the team. The results validated that:
Option 1 had the highest click-through rate of 30%.

And invalidated:
Option 2 has the lowest rate of 0%
Option 3 had the second highest of 10%


The sixth step: iterate

Based on the results, the team preferred to refine the page section with a single line of messaging in larger copy and a CTA.

Option 5

Refine the page section with larger copy and button

Option 5: Refine the page section with larger copy and button
Option 5: Refine the page section with larger copy and button

The fifth step: Test 2


Results round 2:
The refined page section option 5 had a click-through rate of 20%.

Final direction:

It was clear to me that despite the testing results the team preferred to use option 4 rather than option 1, so my final recommendations were to:

Replace the “Optimism section” with the new Cost to Switch plus CTA section in Sonnet Blue using the primary Sonnet Black button not the secondary button. OR

Add secondary buttons to the last “Get a quote” CTA on each page. This would keep the Hero CTA as a first action / thought.

points to call out

This is the final cancellation calculator page.

Visit sonnet.ca to see the redesigned page and website.

No items found.

Lessons learned

Always pursue data driven results.

The project was delivered on time and on budget. The final deliverables were:
Recommendations on usability for access to the page based on remote testing.
The flow and interaction for the cancellation calculator page.

The team was excited to launch a feature during what was called a go-live meeting. Stakeholders seemed to be satisfied with the final decision. The main measure of success was how many people used the feature and either saved or purchased insurance.

Although, at the time this feature was deemed a very important piece of the roadmap, months later, it was pushed down the list by a website redesign by the same stakeholders.

Although data driven results should have override assumptions in all cases. This project taught me that data driven results does not always override emotion and unfamiliarity among team members and stakeholders.

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